W292 Levels áand ápatterns áof ánucleotide ávariability áand ápopulation ádifferentiation áin á Populus: áinsights áfrom átranscriptome áresequencing áand áSNP ágenotyping á

Date: Sunday, January 15, 2012
Time: 11:50 AM
Room: Sunrise
Armando Geraldes , University of British Columbia - Department of Botany, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Christopher J. Grassa , University of British Columbia - Department of Botany, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Gancho T. Slavov , Institute of Biological, Environmental & Rural Sciences, Aberystwyth University
Wellington Muchero , Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831, USA, Oak Ridge, TN
Ranjan Priya , Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
Par K. Ingvarsson , Umea University - Plant Science Centre, Umea, Sweden
Stefan Jansson , Umeň University, Umeň, Sweden
Gerald Tuskan , Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
Carl J. Douglas , University of British Columbia, Dept. of Botany, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Quentin C. B. Cronk , University of British Columbia - Department of Botany, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Levels and patterns of nucleotide variability are shaped by demography and natural selection. In this study we use NGS data from developing xylem transcriptome of 20 natural accessions of Populus trichocarpa to ask: (i) what is the overall level of nucleotide polymorphism in genic regions, (ii) how much variation is there in levels of polymorphism among genes, and (iii) how much variation is there among different site classes. We generated similar data for two other species of Populus (P. balsamifera, 3 natural accessions, and P. tremula, 4 natural accessions) and compare levels of nucleotide polymorphism and divergence among species for different classes of sites to estimate the strength of selection across species in coding and regulatory regions (UTRs). Finally, we genotyped over 28K SNPs in a large population sample of P. trichocarpa to investigate patterns of population differentiation and local adaptation in this species. Genotyping of this same SNP set in a small sample of P. balsamifera allowed us to ask whether interspecific gene flow contributes to levels of population differentiation and local adaptation.