2625
Degraded DNA and Paleogenomics

Though the first DNA sequences from an extinct organism were first extracted 30 years ago, the revolution in sequencing technology has recently allowed for the retrieval and characterization of ancient organisms dating back more than 50,000 years. This new capability has been used to address questions related to admixture, phylogenetic inference, and evolution writ large. This session will attract leading experts in the use of ancient DNA to discuss their recent findings related to both the optimization of methodology, and specific case studies pertaining to humans, plants, and animals.
Date: Sunday, January 11, 2015
Time: 1:30 PM-3:40 PM
Room: Pacific Salon 3
Organizer:
Greger Larson
1:30 PM
How Do You Know When You Don't Have Any Ancient DNA?
Ian Barnes, Natural History Museum

1:45 PM
The Best Bones, Imputation and Ancient Genomics
Daniel G. Bradley, Trinity College Dublin

2:15 PM
Ancient DNA: From Genomes to Epigenomes
Ludovic Orlando, Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen

2:30 PM
Genomic Diversity and Population Dynamics of the Woolly Mammoth Prior to Its Extinction
Eleftheria Palkopoulou, Swedish Museum of Natural History; Swapan Mallick, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School; Pontus Skoglund, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School; Jake Enk, MYcroarray; Nadin Rohland, Department of Genetics Harvard Medical School; Heng Li, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; Ayca Omrak, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University; Sergey Vartanyan, North-East Interdisciplinary Scientific Research Institute N. A. N. A. Shilo, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (NEISRI FEB RAS); Hendrik Poinar, McMaster Ancient DNA Centre, Department of Anthropology, McMaster University; Anders Götherström, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University; David Reich, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School; Love Dalen, Swedish Museum of Natural History

2:45 PM
Resolving the Evolutionary Relationships of Two Enigmatic Ungulates from Pleistocene North America
Peter D. Heintzman, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz; Grant Zazula, Government of Yukon, Department of Tourism and Culture; Beth Shapiro, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz

3:00 PM
Direct Evidence of Milk Consumption from Ancient Human Dental Calculus
Christina Warinner, Dr. Christina Warinner - University of Oklahoma - Department of Anthropology

3:15 PM
The Rise and Fall of the Passenger Pigeon
Beth Shapiro, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz

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